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‘Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me’ shines spotlight on musical legacy

 

 
Overview
 

Genre:
 
Starring: , ,
 
Directed By: ,
 
MPAA Rating:
 
Release Date: March 15, 2012 (limited)
 
Length: 113 minutes
 
Directing
8.0


 
Plot
8.0


 
Acting
7.0


 
Cinematography
8.0


 
Total Score
7.8
7.8/ 10


 

Whoa


Be prepared to be (re-) introduced to one of the most-loved bands of the 20th century.

No


Contextualizing one of pop's most mythologized groups is a big challenge.


Bottom Line

Prior to seeing Nothing Can Hurt Me, non-fans–and even fans–of the band Big Star might wonder (justifiably) if a film could adequately contextualize one of pop’s most mythologized groups. That question is answered within about a minute, as writer/director Drew DeNicola takes us to the Rock Writers Convention of 1973, where Big Star played to a […]

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Posted July 29, 2013 by

 
Full Review
 
 

Prior to seeing Nothing Can Hurt Me, non-fans–and even fans–of the band Big Star might wonder (justifiably) if a film could adequately contextualize one of pop’s most mythologized groups. That question is answered within about a minute, as writer/director Drew DeNicola takes us to the Rock Writers Convention of 1973, where Big Star played to a roomful of dancing rock critics in Memphis. So, if the band could charm such a bunch of notoriously hard-to-please folks, why couldn’t they live up to record titles such as #1 Record or Radio City and blaze a path to stardom? That’s the question Nothing Can Hurt Me really addresses.

While the film touches on distribution woes, promotion challenges, and other record industry this-and-that, the emotional heft here is revealed in interviews with Chris Bell’s family members and various archival images that make for some poignant reading between the lines. Perhaps most poignant is the sobering realization that so many people featured in the film have passed, leaving us their notable musical legacy. That legacy is duly marked, but never fawned over.

The film is screening in select theaters, on iTunes and On Demand, but no matter how (or where, or when) you see Nothing Can Hurt Me, be prepared to be (re-) introduced to one of the most-loved bands of the 20th century.

 


Mark

 
Mark Woodlief wrote for the cool '90s magazines that didn't make it – Option, Raygun, Warp, The (Seattle) Rocket, CMJ – plus some daily and weekly newspapers, too. Seeing all the great bands – Mission of Burma, Husker Du, Volcano Suns, Flaming Lips, Wire, the dBs, the Feelies, Patti Smith, ad infinitum – he has seen has left him Whopperjawed.


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