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Mud: Gritty portrayal of love and loyalty

 

 
Overview
 

Genre:
 
Starring: , , ,
 
Directed By:
 
Studio: , , ,
 
MPAA Rating:
 
Release Date: May 10, 2013
 
Length: 130 minutes
 
Directing
7.0


 
Plot
8.0


 
Acting
8.0


 
Cinematography
8.0


 
Total Score
7.8
7.8/ 10


 

Whoa


A good script, solid cast and engaging story make this film feel real and resonant.

No


Some of the filmmaker's choices seem familiar and obvious, albeit sincere.


Bottom Line

Matthew McConaughey may bring a pretty-boy hue to many of his acting roles, but he is undeniably gritty in his portrayal of the title character in Mud. Supported by a quality cast and a multi-layered, believable story, he settles in and rides this film to a satisfying conclusion. Two young teenagers, Ellis (the terrific Tye […]

0
Posted May 30, 2013 by

 
Full Review
 
 

Matthew McConaughey may bring a pretty-boy hue to many of his acting roles, but he is undeniably gritty in his portrayal of the title character in Mud. Supported by a quality cast and a multi-layered, believable story, he settles in and rides this film to a satisfying conclusion.

Two young teenagers, Ellis (the terrific Tye Sheridan) and Neckbone (Jacob Lofland), encounter the fugitive, Mud, on an island in the Mississippi River, then decide to help him. A simple good deed (Ellis brings Mud canned food) turns into a complex and (by the film’s conclusion) life-threatening situation.

Of course, there’s a romantic subplot/love interest (hello there, Reese Witherspoon). For all the “independent” vibe here, this is still a Hollywood film, with all the usual tropes. But give writer-director Jeff Nichols credit where credit is due – the locations, characters, themes, etc. are all spot-on. Hell, I’m givin’ the guy credit just for being production manager on the 2004 Townes Van Zandt documentary, Be Here to Love Me. (Now that’s sincerity for you.)

When the film is at its best, Mud hits on all cylinders and weaves a thread of love and loyalty. We don’t always know, Nichols seems to say, why we love and support the people we do – betrayals and obstacles get in the way – but we find a way to honor our commitments.


Mark

 
Mark Woodlief wrote for the cool '90s magazines that didn't make it – Option, Raygun, Warp, The (Seattle) Rocket, CMJ – plus some daily and weekly newspapers, too. Seeing all the great bands – Mission of Burma, Husker Du, Volcano Suns, Flaming Lips, Wire, the dBs, the Feelies, Patti Smith, ad infinitum – he has seen has left him Whopperjawed.


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